(First published in Arteidolia; June 2016)

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Predictably, Eritrea has hit the bottom list (#180), two years in row, in World Press Freedom Index in a report compiled by Reporters Without Borders. Compounding to the absolute information control and monotonous recycling of propaganda are centralization of the arts or abating independent artists through ubiquitous censorship. Enough has been written about the media and centralization of information; therefore, I will share my firsthand account of how the body of arts and censorship operate.Continue reading

(First published in Music in Africa; March 10, 2016)

A long history of censorship, combined with the state’s comprehensive control of the arts sector, has crippled the Eritrean music industry. This unfavorable environment has forced many musicians into exile in other countries. Many of them do not return, while the young continue to flee. This text provides an overview of Eritrean music in exile.

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Exiled Eritrean star Abraham Afwerki, who died tragically in 2006. Photo: YouTube

 

During the pre-independence and colonial era, Eritrean music was characterised by an emotional intensity that prescribed a love for life and nation. It set the tone for the nation’s struggle against repression. Shortly after Ethiopia’s illegal subjugation of Eritrea began after the second World War, Eritrean singers refused to sing as Ethiopian citizens. Haile Selassie’s rule made every effort to ban and discourage Eritrean musicians from performing in national languages such as Tigrinya, which was a source of nationalistic fervor at the time.Continue reading

(From Télam, Argentine National News Agency)

NO PROVIENEN DE UN PAÍS EN GUERRA, PERO REPRESENTAN LA SEGUNDA NACIONALIDAD DE LOS CIENTOS DE MILES DE REFUGIADOS QUE LLEGARON ESTE AÑO A LAS COSTAS EUROPEAS. SÓLO EN LA ÚLTIMA DÉCADA, MÁS DE UN 5% DE LA POBLACIÓN DE ERITREA ESCAPÓ DE UNA DE LAS DICTADURAS MÁS OPRESIVAS DEL MUNDO.Continue reading